Wednesday, April 18, 2018

Dear Santa:

For Christmas, and preferably starting this afternoon, I'd like to stop obsessing over whether my article will be accepted for publication.



Devotedly,

Heather

Photo credit: George Wesley Bellows, Dance at Insane Asylum, 1907; Art Institute of Chicago

Saturday, April 7, 2018

Oh, PMLA.

You know we all love you, and for the most part, we are in line with your observations.

But good lord.

It takes a long time to sift through your chaff to find the wheat.

To be honest, I don't want to know what you think of Lovecraft. Not because it's inaccurate, but because it's been done, and you aren't aware of the prior publications and presentations. You think, as so many do, that you're the first to launch the accusations.

You're not.

I'd apologize, but I'm not sorry.

Smooch. Come back when you've reached adulthood.

Heather

Friday, April 6, 2018

Today's reading: "The Parents of Howard Phillips Lovecraft."

I'm still in the Schultz/Joshi collection and am finishing Kenneth Faig's essay on Lovecraft's parents. It's interesting and a good read, not something I'd necessarily quote in my own work (at this point, anyway), and I recommend it.



The most interesting thing about it is something that isn't obvious at first. We know much, much more about Lovecraft's mother than we do about his father, which is not how these things normally go. My understanding is that, for example, Victorian women's obituaries would quickly turn to details about their husbands or fathers. The fact that we have so many details about Susie Phillips Lovecraft is both interesting and a boon to our understanding of Lovecraft himself. Winfield Scott Lovecraft, his father, was a traveling salesman and thus left little in the way of a mark on the world.

I doubt either of them would have fully understood the mark their son left with us.

Wednesday, April 4, 2018

#100DayProject

This year, I'm doing the #100DayProject, as I did last year and in 2016. It's going to be more reading and, possibly, another chapter developed.


I've read some of the essays in here in other collections. The introduction is a fine one, written by Joshi. More to come.*

*I tried posting this from the Blogger app last night but no luck. It's my day one post.


Saturday, February 17, 2018

Update and reading material.

I got the conference paper from last year's NecronomiCon PVD revised and to the editor on deadline, which was 3 February. I'm less happy with the draft than I wanted to be, but unfortunate family events* kept me from working on it as much as I would have otherwise.

Today's reading material:

...oh, god, I just fell into the MLA wormhole and joined for a year, all because I pulled out the 8th edition handbook.

....aaaaand MLA Humanities Commons profile page is timing out, so no adding info THANKS, OBAMA.

Anyway, what I'm reading today is underneath this green Crown Royal bag containing a brown Blanton's bag containing a small statuette of Cthulhu; two necklaces; a set of gaming dice; a very nice metal spinner that I will never use; a Mythos challenge coin (a sigil is on the reverse) that signifies that I'll be buying all the drinks, given that Cthulhu doesn't exist; and a small handcrafted piece of Mythos art designed to be a menacing octopus.




Adams, Donald K., editor. Mystery and Detection Annual 1972. Castle Press, 1972.

Let's go.

(*) Munch, one of our beloved basset hounds, was diagnosed with and died of lymphoma in the span of 11 days in early January. That was hard, and still is.

Saturday, November 18, 2017

"The nearer a man comes to a calm mind, the closer he is to strength." --Marcus Aurelius

Today's reading is:

Smith, Peter. "HP Lovecraft and the Feast of Saturnalia." Crypt of Cthulhu 13 (1): 4-8. I might also tackle an article on Call of Cthulhu (the tabletop RPG) in this issue.

Friday, November 17, 2017

“The whole future lies in uncertainty: live immediately.” --Seneca

Tonight's reading is from one, possibly more, past issues of Crypt of Cthulhu. I picked up the following issues at NecronomiCon Providence this year, directly from Necromonicon Press:

82; vol. 12, no. 1 (Hallowmas 1992)
85, vol. 13, no. 1 (Hallowmas 1993)
85, vol. 13, no. 3 (Lammas 1994)
93, vol. 15, no. 3 (Lammas 1996)
96, vol. 16, no. 3 (Lammas 1997)
97, vol. 17, no. 1 (Hallowmas 1997)
98, vol. 17, no. 2 (Eastertide 1998)

And the newest one:

108, Hallowmas 2017

The other writing iron in the fire is prep work to get the NecronomiCon presentation whipped into shape for publication.